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SCONE COLD ENCOUNTER

We Christians have our own language. We say these strange things and other Christians know what we mean and/or how to respond. Think about the Catholic church, for example. If someone mentions Paul getting knocked off his beast, we know that is when he encountered God. And, how about “God will meet you right where you are”? I understand it on an intellectual level but… What? Where?

Well, I am definitely not a theologian, but I am a baker. So, often, where I am is in the kitchen. And, guess what, He met me there today. It wasn’t a knocked off my beast and blinded kind of encounter but it hit me right in my heart.

My Middlebourne asked for a scone but I hadn’t baked one in a while. It’s a fussy little recipe so definitely not one of my quick “go-tos.” However, it is one of the few, very few, foods that the whole family enjoys so I decided to make it.

*** The recipe is below with some of my tips to hopefully make it a little less fussy. I would be honored if you would try it. ***

I didn’t see heavenly clouds as I mixed the flour and sugar. I didn’t even marvel at the triune nature of our amazing God as I broke the egg shell and separated the egg yolk from the egg white.

The recipe calls for 5 tablespoons of cut up butter to be mixed in with the flour and then the wet ingredients are added. And egg yolk, 1 cup of sour cream and a bit of vanilla extract seemed to be no match for the 2 cups of flour and half a cup of sugar. Too dry. Could there have been a mistake? Did I measure wrong? These questions come up every time I make this recipe.

As I was laboriously blending and folding, I again had to remind myself that it was going to come together. There would be enough liquid but only as the butter softened.

It was there, in that dry place, where I had the encounter – where He met me.

Do you have a dry place; a relationship that won’t work, a pain that won’t heal, a struggle that you can’t win? I do, all of them actually. In that bowl I was struggling to make it all come together, arm aching and wondering why it wasn’t working. It was chilly, even though the oven was pre-heating and the kitchen was warming. I don’t know why it took longer than usual but Jesus knew it was just the time I needed to recognize how I was struggling to make some things come together in my life and all the time wonder ‘Am I enough’, “Will Jesus help me get it together’?

It was suddenly as clear and bright as Paul’s blinding light. It can’t come together until the softening, the melting occurs. A broken, tattered heart is cold. It is hard. We Christians know all about hardened hearts. God even used it with Pharaoh against Moses. We know it within ourselves too.

Where is your heart hardened? Where is that dry place? If you melt your cold heart, can it come together? I don’t have any answers for myself and certainly not for anyone else. But I know God was showing me where I needed to start if I want to get it to ‘come together’.

 

VANILLA SCONE RECIPE

 

Dry Ingredients

2 Cups of flour

½ Cup of sugar

1 Teaspoon of baking powder

½ Teaspoon of baking soda

½ Teaspoon of salt

5Tablespoons of butter, cold

 

Wet Ingredients

1 Cup of sour cream-full fat (‘cause might as well)

1 Large egg yolk

2 Teaspoons of vanilla extract

 

Glaze

1 ½ Cups of powdered sugar

Water

 

Pre-heat the oven to 400 degrees F.

In a medium bowl, mix the flour, sugar, baking soda, baking powder and salt together. We will deal with the butter in another step.

In a small bowl, combine the egg yolk, sour cream and vanilla extract. The is something so satisfying about laying the bright yellow yolk on the white cream. But don’t do it! It’s better to get the yolk in the bowl first. If you’ve ever dropped a teeny-tiny piece of eggshell into something white then you understand this.

Next, you are get the butter cut into small pieces and add to the flour mixture. You can do this just by cutting it with a knife but a cheese grater does an amazing job. I prefer to use the flat kind of grater and lay it across the bowl as I grate the butter right into the flour mixture. It also helps to stop 2 or 3 times to mix the grated butter in so all of it doesn’t clump up. Mix the butter and flour mixture together very well.

Add the wet mix into the dry and mix together. This will take a few minutes, depending on the temperature. Use a firm blending tool to get all the dry bit mixed in.

When it has come together, pick it up and form it into a loose ball shape then place it in the center of an ungreased baking sheet. Pat it down to a uniform thickness of about ½ inch, trying to keep it round.

Run a large knife under hot water and cut the scone into 8 pieces but leave it together.

Bake it for 18 minutes, spinning ½ way. Depending on your oven, you may want to take it out at 18 minutes then separate the pieces slightly and put back in the oven for 3 or 4 minutes if the center seems too wet.

Mix the glaze with the water until it is thin and smooth. Drizzle it on while the scone is still hot, trying to get it down the sides of each piece.

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Cheap Ways to Prevent Summer Brain Drain

by Erin Shelby

 

Summer is here, which means a break from school for most kids. Did your child experience smooth sailing or nearly failing this school year? Either way, the “brain drain”  that happens during the summer – the normal loss of learning when kids are out for school – can be prevented, and you don’t need lots of money to keep your child learning . Here are three cheap ways to keep kids learning during the summer. 

#1 Create a Summer Journal 

Have your child create a summer journal and be sure that they include writing with every entry. Writing can help kids strengthen the vocabulary they already have and for kids learning to spell, it’s a great tool. Art can make it fun with a journal that includes drawings, sketches, or even clips from magazines, newspapers, or ads. 

#2 Use Your Library Card

Does each member of your family have a membership card to the public library? This is one of the easiest – and cheapest – ways to learn something new during the summer. One of the best-kept secrets of public libraries are their “digital resources” – the things you don’t even have to visit the library to get. Your library website may enable you to access eBooks, test prep materials, family tree information, TV, movies, and so much more, all for free.

#3 Go Old-School for Elementary School

Is your child more comfortable with technology than you are? Believe it or not, old-school solutions can still work for young kids. Visit your local dollar store and you’ll find ways to teach or tutor your child for the basics: colors, shapes, ABC’s, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and more. Summer can be the time to make progress with the help of these old-school tools!

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Living Life Beyond the Golden Arches . . . My Message to all 2021 Graduates

 I once heard a pastor say that the McDonald’s extra value meal represents everything that is wrong with today’s thinking and contradicts everything that honorable members of society should stand for. For example, the idea behind the extra value meal is this: get as much as possible by giving as little as possible. It causes you to ask questions like “How far can I stretch my dollar?” “How much can I get without it costing me very much?” Now don’t get me wrong… I went through college. I lived on Top Ramen.  I know the value of a dollar.  That’s not my point. The question that we should be asking ourselves is, “What can I give knowing that I might get little or nothing in return? You may have noticed there are not that many people asking those kinds of questions which is why I believe society is quickly unraveling at the seams and there are not very many who care to pick up a needle and thread!

Not only does the value meal glorify an unappetizing outlook, but it also sacrifices nutrition and quality for convenience and quantity. The food offered in an extra value meal is not exactly what you want to base your dietary regime on, and yet it’s offered in the largest amount. Its popularity suggests that people will readily forsake what’s good for them for what conveniently and inexpensively satiates their appetite. How popular would the value menu be if the items you could supersize were salads and grilled tilapia? Society is dependent on people who don’t buy into sacrificing anything for convenience…those who are willing to make choices that do not compromise integrity, core values, or Biblical truth. There are so many opportunities in life to sacrifice these things for convenience. Please don’t do it. We all know the value meal does not hold out in the end…you usually end up with a stomachache and quite possibly multiple trips to the bathroom. Society is dependent on people whose character is defined by what they do when no one is looking, what they do when they know they won’t get caught, and what they do when they know they wouldn’t get praised either! People of true character are so needed more than ever right now!

Aside from just the value meal, the whole McDonald’s mentality is all about speed.  Fast food is exactly what the name implies…it is a quick fix.  Instead of putting time and energy into a homemade dinner, you can be in and out of McDonald’s in 5 minutes with everything from your drink to dessert. Scholarship does not reflect this same principal, as you all well know.  You spend hours studying, you pay attention in class, you absorb knowledge. Scholarship is more than getting the right GPA. It is a life-long love of learning… and that does not happen overnight.  Each time you decide you want to learn something; the experience will be so rewarding that the next time will be that much easier and soon learning becomes a habit. At that point, your desire to learn makes getting A’s easier, and the focus isn’t on the grades anymore, but the acknowledgment that life is full of learning opportunities…embrace it!

Think about McDonald’s slogan… “I’m lovin’  it.” The world says… it’s all about me! I’m hungry…  I gotta feed the need.  An honorable member of society says the opposite and prizes citizenship above all which involves looking out for the needs of a group. It requires you to look beyond your own interests as encouraged in Philippians 2:4 – “Each of you should look not only to your own interests, but also to the interests of others.” (NIV) I love that Paul doesn’t advocate total selflessness but implores his readers to look beyond personal desires and not let them run your life.

The main topic of this blog has not only made me hungry but reminds me of an event in Jesus’ life recorded in John 4: 31-38. The disciples were urging Jesus to eat something. I’m not totally positive on the background of that, but for some reason they were. Jesus’ response to them was simple: “I have food to eat that you know nothing about.” As the disciples were wondering who could have snuck him a snack pack, Jesus patiently went on to explain that His sustenance was doing the work of the Father and He was looking for some additional employees. The harvest of men’s souls was ready to be reaped. Others had laid the groundwork and it was time for the disciples to pick up their garden tools. Oftentimes we reap the benefits of someone else’s works. A good leader does that. They learn from other’s mistakes. They learn from other’s examples. You have amazing parents and a heritage of teachers and education that you can reap from and build your leadership style from. You in turn will sew what others will reap. You will lead by example. You will lay the groundwork for your siblings, your friends, or future students to harvest. What you leave behind as you use your God-given leadership abilities to do his will.

And that’s the main point that I want to leave you with.  None of this means anything without a personal relationship with the Lord and a desire and dedication to doing His will. He loves you. He created you. He gave you the characteristics that are recognized in this society.  My charge to you is this: seek to understand how you can use them for God’s glory. He promises to be faithful to complete the good work that he’s begun in you. Allow yourself to be used by him. Do not give into the value meal theology and the McDonald’s mentality. Live your life beyond the Golden Arches. Just some food for thought. Congratulations on all your achievements and the many more that have yet to be seen.

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Facing the Critic Within

We’ve never seen him (or, her – for me it’s a him) but we’ve all heard his voice. Call him the voice of doubt, the inner critic or, heck, call him the natural thief of confidence and productivity. It all means the same thing. It’s that nagging voice that comes from within. I hear it all the time. After all, I believe that I am my harshest critic.

Self-criticizing can be very detrimental. It can stifle creativity. It can cause you to doubt your abilities and the work you’re doing to the point where it slows you down or even leaves you completely unproductive. It can cause image issues, relationship fears, and often leads to full-blown depression.

All this to say that the critic within needs to be taken seriously and managed appropriately. To avoid the downward spiral that leads to self-destructive behavior, it is my humble opinion that the critic needs to be listened to and responded to because it can’t be all-together avoided. If, instead, we can harness the criticism and re-direct it into self-improvement, we will become happier and more successful people. So, how do we do that?

First, we must accept the fact that no one is perfect. We aren’t, never will be, and expec

tations of perfection are both ludicrous and harmful. Goals are great but keeping them realistic is critical so that we set ourselves up for success.

Next, we need to identify the motivational source of the voice. Is this coming from a place deep inside where we know we have room for improvement in a certain area? Or, is this coming from a place of pain? A place of deception? For some, the critic within comes from a place where they have been hurt in the past.

For example, a boy that was teased as a child for being overweight can grow up to be a man who feels fat no matter how much time he spends in the gym or how many times he passes on the French fries, opting instead for the kale salad. That’s when you know the voice is a liar and needs to be kicked out of your life. Choosing the gym and the kale salad made the man a better version of himself than accepting his “fate” as a fat man and eating French fries while watching The Biggest Loser in tears would have. But, he already made that improvement so, continuing to listen to that voice would only mean inevitable self-destruction. Time to move on.

As a Christian, I also believe that the voice within me can be the Holy Spirit shining a light on dark spots in my life that need to be exposed so that I can improve. So that I can become the man I was created to be and live the life I was created to live. That’s a voice I want to listen to because it makes me a better person and, ultimately, a happier one.

As a writer, the critic within can make my work better. Again, I just need to learn to harness it and use it for good rather than let it overwhelm me and take me down the path of self-destruction. Like me while I’m on this side of heaven, my work will never be perfect. And, also like me, there’s always room for improvement. We are all works in progress. And, until my books are in print, I’m trying to improve every little detail until I have to let go.

The bottom line is that the critic within can be a good thing. Or, it can be your worst enemy. The choice is up to you. One thing that’s for sure, we all face that voice from time to time. The trick is in how we decide to handle that standoff.

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No Running Down the Halls in Teacher Shoes

by M. N. Kollar

 

Stand up straight. Smile but not too big. Hands steady and calmly clasped in front of me.  Wait for the students to settle. Oh yeah, and somehow hold back the rivers of sweat about to roll down my forehead and pits. I remind myself that any day I don’t run screaming out of the classroom is a victory.

Every day is the first day of school when you are a substitute teacher. I started out anxious to fill little minds and touch little hearts and ended up wanting to push myself into a locker for the whole day.

When they were in a state of what passed for ‘settled,’ I handed out the blank sheets of paper. The teacher had left a list of essay questions to be chosen from and I selected what I hoped would be a fun easy one and wrote it on the board. Those blank sheets, those cold stares, those snickers from the back of the class.

This is high school. I didn’t even sign up for high school jobs, this was one of those pleading phone calls at the last minute that make you feel too guilty not to take. Then my family waved to me like they were sending me off to war.

There he was, my Waterloo. A gang member, maybe, but definitely a tough guy. He walked away from the desk and the sheet of paper and proceeded to sit at another desk and talk to a friend.

My husband looked at me with pain in his eyes and reminded me that high school kids can be mean. I lied to him and told him that I didn’t care, I’ve been toughened up by having a teen aged daughter.

I considered just letting that kid do what he wanted to do. I considered playing it safe and just making it through the day. I considered what it would be like to challenge him and lose. I wiggled my toes in my ‘teacher shoes.’ How I decided to walk over to that new desk and gently lay a crisp blank sheet of paper in front of that kid, who was at least a head taller than me and outweighed my by twenty pounds, I can’t explain. I just did it. Probably not the bravest thing I’ve ever done in my life but pretty darn close.

My oldest, the aforementioned daughter, offered me good advice about not trying to act too cool because teens see right through this and don’t appreciate it. “Besides,” she whispered, waving her hand from side to side at throat level, “you are not cool.”

I wasn’t prepared for a fight or even an argument but I certainly wasn’t prepared for what I received; compliance. Well, maybe it was just indifference but it was good enough! He and the rest of the class accepted my instruction about what was to be written on the blank sheet without much trouble. The assignment was to write an essay about wishes; anything you could wish for. Simple. Heartbreaking. Uplifting. Some could not break free of their bonds and wished for cell phones and sneakers. Some asked me what a trip to Alaska or Paris might be like. I referenced the Aurora Borealis and sitting in cafes. We talked. We laughed. We dreamed.

My oldest son, wise beyond his years but not eager to voice his opinion, just hugged me a little tighter when he heard I was heading to a high school.

I was not cool but I did actually know some stuff. When one of them asked me how to spell environment, I remarked that it was a tricky word and that I always pronounced it ‘environ-ment’ in my head when spelling it to help me get it right. For whatever reason, I was called in to corroborate that a tomato was indeed a fruit. ‘Tough Guy’ asked me about where I lived and was it nice and what were my kids like. I talked WITH him and the others. I didn’t talk AT them or DOWN to them.

My youngest had no idea about the treacherous water Mom was about to be thrown into but he could feel the icy winds of fear blowing around the family. He made sure I had an orange with me.

My biggest surprise came at the end of the class. Since we did officially make it through the assigned task, I set about drawing picture riddles on the board as a treat. I wasn’t sure if they were too old for this type of thing because I usually sub in elementary school and do not have a high school ‘bag o’ tricks.’ It turned out that the class enjoyed the riddles immensely and were fully engaged. Some of the kids even began to share some of their own visual riddles.

What surprised and amazed me was when one boy, clearly neuroatypical and with a severe speech impediment, drew something on the board and began to talk about it. The other kids in no way ignored him, brushed him aside, belittled his efforts or displayed any of the attitudes I would have expected. I watched as they patiently tried to make sense of what he drew and spoke. They put their full efforts into participating with him. The way they treated him just melted and reshaped my heart. I was blown away. I was humbled. What I would have missed out on if I had played it safe and just tried to make it through the day.

I wondered a lot of things about that day. What if I hadn’t laid down that sheet of paper? What if I had decided the kids were too old for games? 

Most school days I do admire teachers, the ones that walk into that classroom day after day and year after year. Admiration, certainly, but not envy. On that day, however, I envied that feeling of connecting with these amazing kids and maybe even making a small difference in their lives. I did manage to teach them something that day; tomatoes are fruit and Alaska and Paris are worth a visit. It may be a cliché, (who cares – many things become clichés because they are true) but I received more than I gave that day and, because of it, I became a better person.

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7 (of the many) Authors Who Have Influenced Me As A Writer

by C.S. Elston

 

C.S. Lewis

While the list is in no particular order, I thought I’d start with C.S. Lewis and his fantastic Chronicles of Narnia series because of both comparisons to my series, “The Four Corners,” and the fact that we share the same first two initials (although, I’m Christopher Scott – not Clive Staples.) The Narnia books were staples (pun absolutely intended) in my house when I grew up. “The Screwtape Letters” also blew me away in high school and books like “Mere Christianity” and “A Grief Observed” are works I recommend to everyone. C.S. Lewis has had as big of an impact on me as a writer and a person as anyone else on the planet. Absolute genius.

 

Dean Koontz

The “Odd Thomas” series is very popular and very fun. Koontz is another prolific writer with great commercial success. One of the more underrated books he’s written is called “Relentless” and may be a compilation of every author’s worst nightmares.

 

J.R.R. Tolkien

The entire Middle Earth saga (The Hobbit,” “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy, and “The Silmarillion”) is a breathtaking masterpiece. The Peter Jackson films are awesome, too. But, the books the movies come from were a revelation when they were written in the 1950’s. Tolkien made me realize that both the devil and God can be found in the details.

 

H.G. Wells

Novels like “The Time Machine, “The Island of Doctor Moreau,” and “War of the Worlds” captivated my imagination when I was growing up. Wells had a brilliant mind and he made me realize the importance of romance in stories that, on the surface, seem to have nothing to do with love but the deeper you dig the more you realize that’s what they’re all about. That’s not just a lesson on writing, but on life.

 

Richard Matheson – “Somewhere In Time”

Richard Matheson is another excellent writer who has had a lot of his books turned into movies (“Stir Of Echoes”, “I Am Legend”, etc.) including the well thought of “What Dreams May Come” which was both enjoyable and disturbing for me due to it’s distorted view of heaven. But, I first discovered Matheson when I saw the movie “Somewhere In Time” and loved it.  starring Christopher Reeve, Jane Seymour and Christopher Plummer. It was captivating to me. So, I read the book (originally called “Bid Time Return” but changed for marketing reasons to match the film title) and liked it even better.

 

The Stephen King & Frank Darabont collaboration

Stephen King is a brilliant and prolific writer. No question. But, I would argue that some of his best work is after it has been polished into a screenplay by Frank Darabont. This is how we got the movies The Green Mile (adapted from King’s serial novel of the same name) and The Shawshank Redemption (adapted from King’s novella “Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption”). The latter is a particularly wonderful screenplay to read and my favorite movie of all time.

 

Harper Lee – “To Kill A Mockingbird”

This book (as well asthe 1962 movie starring Gregory Peck) made me want to write about real people and real problems. It also cemented, in both my writing and me as a person, themes of justice, redemption and truth. This is not only the greatest novel of the 20th century, it’s one of the greatest, if not the greatest, novels of all time. I have to admit though, I wish they had left “Go Set A Watchman” in the drawer where it was kept for 55 years.

 

Of course, I could easily go on and make this list a lot longer.  How could I not include the likes of J.K. Rowling, Madeleine L’Engle, Arthur Miller, Richard Adams, Tennessee Williams, William Goldman, Chaim Potok, Diane Kinman, Shel Silverstein, Dante Alighieri, Richard Connell, Horton Foote, Nora Ephron, John Grisham, Michael Morris, John Steinbeck…? See how long this list could get? Too much for one post. Perhaps “Part Two” will be in order at some point. Until then, I appreciate the opportunity to share my thoughts and reflections on some of the superb writers who have influenced me over the years. Happy reading…

 

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The Inspiration Behind “The Blue Phoenix and the Silver Foxx”

by Elaine Beth Doebereiner

Readers have expressed a curiosity about where I discovered the inspiration for my first novel. The truth is that the story was born from a dream I had at age 16. I was an aspiring writer in junior high and high school. The only thing I found time for was my poetry, however. I never forgot that dream even into adulthood. I tried several times to sit down and write the story that had been born in my mind. I would get 10 chapters written and then scrap it. Then, a year later, I would write 12 chapters and throw those out, too. The story was not good enough in my eyes. So, I took a long break from it but never stopped thinking about the characters that I had not been able to do justice. Created and birthed in my mind, I watched as they grew up and developed. Soon I was losing sleep thinking about them and their story. The characters had become like children to me and I believed it was my duty to give them life. So, I took the sleepless nights as a sign from God that it was time to finally write this story for real.

The initial dream that I had at 16 was basically just one short incident with one character. A young girl falling from a mountain top with the mission of saving earth. The scenery was vivid, and the girl was so real to me. I constructed the other characters and plot around this singular point of origin. Other constructs came to life as I realized, I have always wanted to make a difference in the world. I have always had this burning desire to help others. What better way to reach an audience then through a story where they can see themselves in the characters and experience what the characters feel? So, I set out to write a book that could be a beacon of hope and inspiration to the world.

I added in the bible verses because I saw them as favorites of the characters writing the journal entries. They serve to make the characters feel more connected to God as they find comfort in His Word and I wanted the readers to feel that same comfort. My desire is that my readers will know that they are not alone. God’s not dead. There is hope. Your prayers are indeed answered even if you don’t realize it at the time. They may be not answered in the way or the timeframe you think they should be but God knows better than we do. Be patient and trust Him. We all make mistakes and those mistakes do not define us, you just have to learn from them and move on. Its healthy to experience sadness, failure and all the bad feels. You cannot grow as a person, or in faith, or in spirituality without facing fear, going out of your comfort zone, and learning from life’s experiences.  If you need guidance or counsel, open the bible, the answers are there.

I also made the characters a hodge podge of people. Different genders, races, ethnicities, angels, humans, demons. . . a total mixture. This was purposefully executed in the hopes that I could convey the fact that it does not matter who you are or where you’re from, you can do the work of God and we can all do it together. We are all His children. We should love one another no matter who or what we are and regardless of the color of our skin. You can choose your own path no matter the manner of your birth or where you came from. You do not have to be perfect to do good things in this world. When you think that God is not doing anything to help the world, stop and think about how much he loves us, His creations, His children. He gave his only son to die on the cross so that we could live. He wouldn’t do something phenomenal like that and then just turn His back on those He sacrificed for. He places special people in our lives on purpose, events happen that shape us, and I believe that angels do walk among us, strategically placed to keep the balance and to help mankind. All you have to do is keep an open mind, be observant, be patient, and have faith.

What started out as just a dream evolved into hopeful inspirational ideals. I pray the world loves the characters and this story as much as I do and I hope it touches the hearts of many around the world. It would be such an honor to know that it helped people and made a difference in their lives.

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February Book Recommendations

by Andrea Elston

As a teacher, February was always the most overwhelming month. First of all, it’s the shortest month of the year with the most holidays packed into it! Secondly, at least where I taught, we had a “mid-winter break” in the schedule which made an already abbreviated month one week shorter. Finally, the 100th day of school usually fell at the end of the month as well! And the fact that it is also Black History month created an even more packed itinerary! At any other time of the year, I was searching for bulletin board ideas and supplemental activities to keep my kiddos entertained but come February I was wondering how in the world I was going to fit it all in and which event I was going to feature! Between Groundhog Day, Valentine’s Day, Presidents’ Day, the 100th day of school, and honoring the men and women who helped shape the future of this great nation, I definitely had my pick! Although time was short to fit everything in, these old standbys always made the cut! If your plate is not already full, I encourage you to try and squeeze in one more item from this menu…Bon Appetit!

Groundhog Day: I always made time to read Punxsutawney Phyllis by Susanna Leonard Hill. This is a girl after my own heart…instead of complaining about a problem, she goes right to the solution and isn’t afraid to bend the rules a bit while she does it! I also told my class about the 1993 movie Groundhog Day with Bill Murray and Andie MacDowell. Because I taught first grade, the PG rating was a tad too much for that age group, so I just gave them the highlights. We talked about the pros and cons of waking up and reliving one day over and over again, and then I had them choose a day from their past (not hard for a 6-year-old) that they would want to do over and over again. It was so cute to hear their stories that ranged from birthday parties to snow days, to Kindergarten graduations. Depending on the time frame, I’d either leave it at discussion or turn it into a writing project.

Valentine’s Day: I know you have a plethora of choices when it comes to books for this holiday, but please add Somebody Loves You Mr. Hatch by the great Eileen Spinelli to your list. Even though this is a picture book, the theme is appropriate for any age and MANY lessons can be drawn from it. And if you can read it while eating a heart-shaped box of chocolates, it just makes it that much better!

Presidents’ Day:  If there is one person from the past I would like to sit down and have a cup of coffee with, it would be Abraham Lincoln. His historical interaction with Grace Bedell strikes a chord with me and I believe will with your children and or students as well. Mr. Lincoln’s Whiskers by Karen B. Winnick highlights this relationship in a sweet and accurate way, even picturing a copy of the real letter from the sweet 11-year-old girl. Just like the above book, this literary work lends itself to SO many extension activities…or just serve to be a heartwarming story for bedtime, snacktime, circle-time, or History-time.

100th Day of School: Again, you have a multitude of titles to choose from for this special occasion like 100th Day Worries by Margery Cuyler, but I always added in Michael Frith’s I’ll Teach My Dog 100 Words. Because I taught the littles, I would turn this book into a spelling exercise and have the kiddos write down all 100 words that the narrator taught his dog. If I was teaching older students, I would have them debate what the 100 most important words to teach a dog would be. Plus, it’s illustrated by P.D. Eastman which is always a bonus!

Black History Month: I usually read this book in January when celebrating Martin Luther King Jr. Day, but it would also serve to highlight the struggles needed to be overcome for African Americans in the mid-20th century. If you haven’t already, please do not miss the opportunity to read and discuss Goin’ Someplace Special by the amazingly talented and prolific Patricia McKissack. I always get a little choked up when I read the information at the end of the book that describes how Nashville’s public library board of directors quietly voted to desegregate all their facilities in the 1950’s. Being a semi-autobiographical story as well makes this literary work that much more , well…special, and the beautiful illustrations by Jerry Pinkney make it not only good for the soul, but pleasing to the eye as well.

 

 

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After Intermission

by Erin Shelby

Musical theatre is on intermission.

There isn’t much going on, in person that is.

The acting has arrived at a terribly long pause.

The singing is at an abnormally long rest.

The dancing has stopped.

The costumes are on the rack. Are they going to smell like mothballs when we’re ready to use them again?

In-person arts are on pause, for now, that is.

There are so many reasons why people are missing the performing arts. Why do people love the arts so much? What does singing and dancing and acting add to our world that we’re missing right now?

The arts are a community.

When theatre venues open their doors again, they will reveal themselves as community centers. Gathering places, if you will. Whether it’s to watch a play, see a musical, or go to the ballet, people use the arts to socialize. Relationships are formed in these places, and for some, it’s like a family. Everyone needs a place where they can go to be part of a larger community, and for some people, it’s the artistic places.

The arts are revealing.

In a world where loudness is often valued over quiet confidence, getting involved in an artistic production can allow people to analyze deep issues while exploring a script. The arts can be an equalizer for people of all backgrounds and personality types to come together around a common cause. Personally, I don’t thrive at a busy party or in an open-floor plan office, but in an artistic setting, I enjoy making connections with other people while we’re striving toward a common goal. No matter how you’re wired or how you would describe yourself, the arts can provide a place for you to create something beautiful alongside others.

The arts welcome you.

For now, the arts are mostly closed, but when this intermission is over, there will be a place for you. Community theatres will need people to fundraise, publicize, paint set pieces, help with props, sell tickets, and so much more. If you’re ready to play, the arts will welcome you.

That is, after this intermission is over.

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Goodbye 2020, Hello 2021!

by Andrea Elston

2020 is officially history and it’s hard to imagine that makes too many people sad. It was a tough one, in many ways, but there were also some great things that happened. For example, while we formed this company in the second half of 2019, it really started ramping up in early 2020. The first author we brought into the fold signed with us in April and we are thrilled to now have 14 members of the Shine-A-Light family with several others currently under consideration. We also published 14 manuscripts (not including the 4-6 freebies per month we have been putting on our site since September) this year and are excited about the 24 that are in the editing/formatting phases right now. Within our family, we are aware of 48 additional projects that are currently in the writing and/or development phases, too.

All of that makes the prospect of 2021 very exciting to us and we are intent on it being the year we build the support element of the family atmosphere. To aid in this process, we have reserved a private Facebook group and a new YouTube channel. We are hoping that the “members only” Facebook group can be a place where we are all able to communicate with one another and share ideas about how to promote our work. The YouTube channel will be a place to help us gain exposure. We would like to produce material that both private schools can use in chapels and educators in the classroom.

Speaking (or, writing) of exposure, we wanted to attend private school and homeschool conventions in 2020 but they all got cancelled due to COVID-19. We are currently signed up for an event here in Arizona scheduled for July, one in Tennessee scheduled for March and a third in April that will hopefully happen in Texas. There are others we also plan to attend in Florida, Colorado and New York. These conferences would be great exposure for Shine-A-Light as a company as well as for the whole family and their individual works. Please join us in praying that these opportunities are not taken away from us again this year. Especially now that we have built up a bigger inventory of great material and have so much more to offer.

Goodbye, 2020. You weren’t all bad. Cheers to 2021!